CaliberPulse

Caliber Group has launched CaliberPulse.com to help businesses stay abreast of the latest consumer behaviors, opinions and marketing trends to survive and thrive. Our agency excels at building brands and relationships. We’re well versed in the use of both traditional and social media to educate, influence or persuade audiences. To deliver an effective message, we know you have to understand your clients/customers: what they want and what they need.

What can you expect to find on CaliberPulse.com?

  • National, regional and local consumer behavior trends and opinions.
  • Insider marketing, public relations and Web marketing trends and tips.

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Building Collaborations and Consensus More Challenging in Arizona

Last week I attended a presentation by Dr. Lattie Coor, chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona and Arizona State University president emeritus, and learned some meaningful statistics about Arizona residents that communicators will find valuable when engaging with Arizona audiences. These facts were published recently in a state-level report on Arizona’s civic health prepared by the center, with help from the National Conference on Citizenship, a Congressionally chartered organization that publishes America’s Civic Health Index (1).

And I Approve This Message

You’ll be hearing that phrase frequently as political season winds down this month. TV political advertising spending throughout the country is headed to set a record this year. It’s estimated that $3 billion will be spent by the Nov. 2 general election, breaking previous highs of nearly $2.7 billion in 2008 (a presidential election year) and $2.4 billion in 2006. Nationally, non-political advertisers should expect limited or premium-priced inventory availability this month. However, air-time inventory is reasonably available in the local market.

Knock the Dust Off Your Marketing Plan

It’s time to start thinking about your marketing plan for the next year, assuming your fiscal year starts January 1. Around this time of year, assessment and planning starts. What advertising has worked? Should we put more money into interactive advertising? Do we need to revamp our website? While these are all things you should be thinking about, we recommend that you dig deeper.

The “100-Mile Expert” Rule

Earlier this year, I gave a presentation on social media marketing at the League of Historic American Theatre’s national conference, which was held in San Antonio. The 60 theatre-proprietors and attendees that flew in for the conference were very eager to learn about the latest tips and tricks on the ever-expanding social media landscape. Many attendees I talked to claimed that they had seen social media speakers in their own cities, but told me my workshop was the best one they had ever been to. Flattery aside, it is always nice to have people appreciate your expertise. But I realized that I became a victim of the “100-Mile Rule,” which is a term our office has coined for consultants and subject-experts who are viewed as being more credible strictly because they are new, different and work at least 100 miles away.

Good reputations are built on good behavior

Earlier in my career, I met with a business owner who asked me to promote his achievements. His goal was to build awareness and credibility as an expert in his field, among his prospective customers, peers and the media. After telling me about his many good deeds that deserved recognition, I asked him whether he had done any bad things that could harm his reputation and would make it impossible to reach his goal. Naturally, he responded that he had a stellar career and there were no skeletons in his closet. This challenge sounded intriguing, so I went to work and developed a smart public relations strategy to build his reputation. While I was preparing to execute this strategy, I opened the newspaper and discovered one skeleton that my client failed to share with me. To counter the bad news, my client asked me to immediately ramp up his public relations plan and start communicating all of his accomplishments. However, he failed to explain why he was not truthful earlier about his past mistake that made the news.

Laziness about Privacy Settings Can Put You in Peril

Lindsay Lohan, the controversial actress and singer, wrote a song in 2004 called “Rumors” that focused on her need for privacy. Even though she hasn’t done the best job of staying out of the news, her pop hit was slightly prophetic, as confidentiality and personal space has become one of the largest issues surrounding social media use. Whether it’s regarding a Facebook account or an internal networking system, people may be feeling a little like Lindsay did and say, “Well, I just need a little space to breathe. Can you respect my privacy?” Companies and their employees should know the intricacies of their privacy settings to ensure that needed breathing room is always available.

‘Off the record’ comments today could be published tomorrow

Imagine a reporter is interviewing you on a topic of your expertise, whether print, broadcast or online. You’re having a robust, yet friendly discussion that wanders from the original topic into area that is more sensitive. The reporter is engaging and disarming. You’re comfortable with the reporter and begin a sentence: “Off the record …” You feel deceived and a bit hurt when your “off the record” words are in ink and blasted all over the Internet the next day.

Let Others Send You New Business

Building good relationships with your potential competitors could lead to your phone ringing. Sevans Strategy, a public relations company based in Chicago, has decided to create a page on the owner’s blog, PRSarahEvans.com, recommending other public relations companies.

Load Your Marketing Tool Belt with Technology

Have you noticed that multi-tasking is no longer a unique skill, but rather, it is universally expected? The largest contributor to our lengthy, daily task list is technology. Some of us see it as a huge hill and have to prepare ourselves for the challenge. Others see technology as the wrapped package that sat under the Christmas tree the longest. You finally get to open it, but first you shake it, try to peak through the paper and then quickly tear the paper away and begin exploring it. However you embrace technology, consider it a tool on your marketing tool belt. It is a mechanism to help get you from point A to point Z, as society is no longer happy going from A to B anymore.

Put Down Your Scissors and Pick Up Your Phone

Your phone may replace your scissors when it comes to coupon savings. More than 42 million people in the United States own a smartphone, which means that they have the capability to receive media-rich information from companies and organizations. Some marketers have been wary to send information about their products or services to current and potential customers’ mobile devices, even though smartphone owners are requesting information about their favorite brands.

Last Night, a Tweet Saved My Life

As social media becomes more popular in practically every demographic group, so is its ability to communicate directly with companies and agencies. This trend extends to reaching out through platforms such as Twitter for help, whether to properly fix a customer service issue or to relieve a true emergency. The American Red Cross recently conducted a survey that concluded about one in five adults in the United States would use social media to contact emergency responders in a disaster. The immediacy of social media enables it to spread information about an ongoing emergency as people want or need help. If 911 systems are inundated with calls or phone lines are down, it’s reasonable to expect use of available communication tools and expect a prompt response. Thus, tweeting and posting can be a matter of life and death.

Seize the Good News: Tucson Makes Top 20 in Forbes’ Innovation List

After a long month of controversial legislative decisions putting Arizona in the national media hot seat, some welcome positive news emerged: Tucson came in as number 19 on Forbes’ list of “America's Most Innovative Cities.” Tucson’s rankings, as reported by the May 27 Arizona Daily Star: • 31st for technology and science jobs • 27th for creative jobs • 16th in patents per capita • 45th in venture investments per capita. The ranking puts Tucson is the company of San Jose, Calif., was at the top of the list, followed by Austin, Texas; Raleigh, N.C.; San Francisco; and Seattle. Phoenix or New York did not make the top-20.